Dogme ELT 2.0

Making the simple complex
or
Making the complex simple?



This post is part of a teacher-training workshop on using the web2.0 platform, Ning, with adult language learners, I'm Ningin' it, and also is a comment on the comments on Nick Jaworski's Crazy or Enlightened.

Best,
Karenne

Crowd Wise 4b: Lurkers are..? (Roles)

You are not one of the myriad of interchangeable pieces,
but a unique human being, and if you've got something to say,
say it, and think well of yourself while you're learning to say it better.
David Mamet

I do not participate or contribute to every online educational group I belong to.  I do not comment on every blog post I read: sometimes I feel intimidated by the other contributors, sometimes I am not sure that I have anything of value to add to the conversation, sometimes I do not know what is expected or appreciated...

 


And sometimes, I just don't have the time to write out a response.

As discussed in 3d, Does size play a role, Jack McGee puts the ratio of lurkers to non-lurkers at  90:10  |edited 02.03.10, previously read 90%, see comments|   

I debunk that theory - when it comes to educational communities - because I have noticed that it tends to be platform and purpose determined, however, agree that it is the larger percentage of any group, even when educational.

So my question is, who are the people we do not see on our platforms, our blogs, on Twitter?

What is their role and how does it compare to their roles in real-life?  Are they the quiet ones in the staff room, the silent listeners at a party? 

If you run an online educational group yourself, what do you do to encourage these members to contribute the value of their wisdom to the community?

If you are what is popularly termed as a lurker (silly word), would you mind breaking the silence just for today (you can do it anonymously) to let us know why you stay silent? 
Thank you!

Best,
Karenne


This posting is part of a series, Crowd Wise, and is, in part, preparation for the swap-shop on web based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th, 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:

Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

Are you ELT's newest TV Star?

For the first time ever, in the long History of Teaching English as a Foreign Language, an opportunity to go glam has come up.

You can become a TV Star.

Seriously.




So what do you have to do?

Read through these guidelines and enter a video of yourself by March 1st, 2010.


Who do you have to be?

A teacher and member of the English Language Teaching Community who has secretly always dreamed of reaching the stars... (oh alright then, who fancies having a bit of fun, doesn't feel too silly about loading up a video into Youtube and who thinks it's a smashing opportunity to share professional development and what we'll be learning there about teaching English with other global trainers).

Best,
Karenne

p.s. The video above is available on youtube here -if you'd like to share the video with your own blog readers - if you have one - you're welcome to.  To do a video response of your own, click on the line that looks like this:




and follow the instructions there - you can also use your webcam to enter.

p.p.s. (My entry is there - if I can try it, you can too!).

Crowd Wise 4a: Leaders are..? (Roles)


The greatest master is he who creates the most masters
Tao te Ching


Whenever I think about leadership in e-learning communities within the field of ELT, these are the following people who immediately spring to my mind as long-running, long-serving and highly experienced e-moderators:

(From top: Carla Arena, David Deubel, Duncan Baker, Gladys Baya, Tara Benwell & Vance Stevens)




At a minimum, without counting, I belong to at least 50 different web2.0 groups: on LinkedIn, Xing, Orkut, Google, Facebook, Ning, Moodle and Yahoo!Groups.  

My role on these varies across the different platforms: for most of these, I am a lurker(!), on others I contribute infrequently, responding to a call out for help or providing monthly blog summaries - not just of my own blog:), and on others, I contribute very often.  

In some, I actively and regularly engage in lively debates - sometimes heated exchanges on methodology, technology and pedagogical best practices.

I even run two groups aimed at other English teachers: one of which is on Facebook (strictly connected to my blog and helping my readers who choose to connect with me there) and one is entirely dedicated to enabling ELTbloggers to meet each other and collaborate across the blogosphere.  I  also have groups where I work in private blended learning courses with students.

BUT... I wouldn't begin, not even for a second, to put myself in the knowledge categories of those I've pictured above.*  


And that makes me wonder:   
what is it, that creates an amazing e-community leader?   


Many people believe, like rules, that having a specific leader isn't necessary and that communities can drive themselves.  On some this does work, on others it doesn't. Fact is, some leaders created their groups to serve their own (financial) agendas and simply do not communicate, care about or give anything back to their members.  Some  started their communities as part of an experiment in e-learning, something to put on the CV because it looks cool,  some gave up on the concept way before their group reached critical mass and others have been taken over by trolls, spammers and pirates.

I've seen, first hand, throughout the last three years that great leadership is not something to take lightly and is something to take special note of.   But what are the qualities these people possess?   Is it the desire to share? 

How are they able to lead others - people which, most of the time, they have only met online?  Did they learn how to do this, read books - which ones?  Or was it a skill they simply innately possessed dormant until the internet was born?

Let's do a quick experiment, for a second, read this ad:



I wonder...
How would the rest of the job ad read?



Best,
Karenne

**Although there are many, many, many other online edu-group leaders I could have featured in the mosaic above,  I have specifically chosen ones in the field of ELT where there has been a clear leadership model over a long period of time, in communities I belong to or participated in.  However, please don't hesitate to recommend other great moderators you have also noted.   

Pictured:

This posting is part of a series, Crowd Wise, and is, in part, preparation for the swap-shop on web based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th, 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:

Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

 

More English Language Teachers on Twitter

A few days ago a fellow English teacher wrote to find out if she could be added to the Tweepl list linked in the ELT Guide to Twitter post and early this evening I had two more similar requests.

And suddenly, it hit me... kind of like a comet zooming in from out of the Twitterverse... that I'd created the first list way back in August 2009 and since that time, many, many, many more ELTers have since joined us on Twitter.


And, as Tweepl is such an incredibly easy way to follow a whole bunch of people, in a specific niche, at  a single click, I've decided to start up another list: an open-ended one so if you find that your name isn't on the original one nor on this one but you are an English language teacher and you'd like to connect with others like you, simply do the following:


In the comment box below or via DM on Twitter, write ALL of the following
  • your name
  • your name on twitter (or @someone else who you know but who's not yet on the lists)
  • your twitter id/ url
  • Please also confirm that you are in ELT: ESL/EFL/ESOL etc 
as this list isn't a general teachers' list: thanks for understanding!
      *and if you're a blogger, do add your blog url too as I can keep track of your posts for @BloggersELT
e.g.
Karenne 
@kalinagoenglish 
http://twitter.com/kalinagoenglish 
http://kalinago.blogspot.com

I'll then pop on over to twitter to check that the above information is correct and if it is, I'll add you :-)

Best,
Karenne

n.b. Please note that as I will be personally recommending real English Language Teachers to other real English Language Teachers who are on the site in order to develop professional and personal friendships there, no tweeters with corporate brand management identities as their profiles nor those who fill the stream with endless links towards commercial sites will be included within my list.  

Thank you for your understanding on this issue.

If you're on this list and you'd prefer not to be, don't hesitate to DM or email me.


HOW TO
1. Click on the link(s) below
2. Either click to select all or review and personalize.
3. Enter your twitter details within the box provided.


EL teachers on Twitter

Twitter: 4 students 2?

Despite the following tweet:



and the amazing responses within an incredibly short time -  the wow! factor from my students who'd never seen anyone tweet before (though the site seems to be referenced on the news a lot these days) -  the fact that I could share the answer to their question as it came back to them in real time....

I still seem to be on the fence when it comes to combining learning and Twitter.

My problem with it is that there is so much "other" going on.  


I mean, who would they follow - teachers?   But the teachers are busy tweeting to their PLNs, wouldn't that become sort of weird and horribly dull after a while?

Well... they could follow other students, develop their own PLNs... but then, hmm... I guess it'd work but how would they know when the answer was the right answer?  How could they organize the information, reference it, keep track of it?

Hashtags set up on the different subjects?   


Thinking about it, I would add a twitter tracker function to my students' Ning if I knew for sure that there was someone moderating a specific hashtag, in my case one aimed at English Language Learners...but what code?  For the most part, #esl and #efl don't really mean anything to our students - wonder what would?

Random thoughts, random.


Yours?

Best,
Karenne





p.s. The Answer (courtesy of the British Council via Mtranslator on Twitter)

p.p.s Many, many thanks to GreatGrammarGurus:

Useful links
See Jen Vershoor's blog posting on Twitter in the Classroom

    Crowd Wise 3d: Does size play a role? (Group Identity)

    Friendship is a plant of slow growth
    Mark Twain  


    According to popular statements regarding the ideal size of a community, the number 150 pops up frequently, however many, if not most, groups aimed at global teachers exceed this number.  

    However, many, if not most, blended-learning communities made up of students fall significantly short of this.

    When it comes to the e-communities you run or have joined, which do you prefer?  Why?



    What happens when the online community is too big?




    What happens when the online community is too small?




    Is there a just right?




    How about the speed of growth?

    When a tribe grows rapidly do you feel ignored, your needs unmet or unnoticed?  Alternatively, have you even been frustrated by communities which seem to be growing slowly?  Why?

    Best,
    Karenne

    Update 15.02.10
    Nice link, hat tip @lclandfield: Seth's Blog, Viral Growth trumps lots of faux followers

    This posting is part of the Crowd Wise series and is in part my preparation for the swap-shop I will be hosting on web-based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

    To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:

    Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

    Crowd Wise 3b: Rules, Rules, Rules (Group Identity)


    The golden rule is that there are no golden rules
    George Bernard Shaw

    Some groups have protocols set in place for when one of their members turns into a troll, becomes overly aggressive, spams or generally threatens the community's ecology. 

    Yet most of the time the idea of setting and following lots of rules makes us shiver and think of... school or worse:




    Many think rules spoil fun.

    Others are threatened by chaos - anyone doing whatever it is they'd like to on their site.

    In your experience, do you think community members can create and define rules themselves, organically, or should the community leader(s) state these right from the offset/after a specific conflict occurs?  How rigid do these need to be?   What do you do when a rule is broken?   Do you step in each time?  Does there need to be a person with this specific responsibility?  

    If you run a site which has avoided setting rules, did you discover unspoken norms somehow setting in over time?   Are your newcomers expected to develop their own sense of how things are done 'round here?

    And, 'fess up, have you ever broken a rule or a norm yourself?
    What were the consequences?

     


    Best,
    Karenne

    This posting is part of the Crowd Wise series and is in part my preparation for the swap-shop I will be hosting on web-based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

    To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:
    http://kalinago.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default/-/crowd-wise  into your reader.  

    Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

    Crowd Wise 3c: Going Public vs Staying Private (Group Identity)

    People have less privacy and are crammed together in cities, 
    but in the wide open spaces they secretly keep tabs on each other a lot more.Sara Paretsky


    Deciding to make a group accessible to anyone in the world vs taking the decision to restrict membership to only a specific type of educator, people who belong to a teaching association or to your own personal group of students is one of the toughest decisions online community leaders make.



    If you are your group's moderator what did you decide to do?  Why did you opt for this? 

    If you don't run a community yourself however you belong to one (or many), which do you prefer - those with anonymous members or spaces where you can easily read the profiles of the participants, see what they look like, what sort of things they're interested in?

    How do you personally feel about sharing your very private details with others?

    When running e-communities with students, have you noticed a marked difference in activity on public, google-searchable-sphere groups vs private groups?   Does the culture and country of origin make any difference?

    If you have noticed this, why do you think this is?

    Best,
    Karenne


    This posting is part of the Crowd Wise series and is in part my preparation for the swap-shop I will be hosting on web-based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

    To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:

    Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

    Crowd Wise 3a: Mission's vision (Group Identity)

    Data is not information, information is not knowledge, 
    knowledge is not understanding, understanding is not wisdom.
    Clifford Stoll


    Amy Jo Kim refers to online communities as:
    A group of people with a shared interest, purpose or goal, who get to know each other over time.



    Do you agree?  Should online communities have a specific purpose for gathering?  Is it important to state the mission and/or vision for being together publicly or privately, right up front?   If you run a e-community what was your approach - how did you articulate this ability to meet their unmet needs?

    Are any of the groups you belong to made up of people from a specific niche?

    Think about some of the groups you belong to versus others, was the function made immediately clear to you or did it look like they were just collecting people?  Can you give any concrete examples?   
     
    Knowing how to reach people is not the same as knowing the membership's needs nor is it knowing why they are there with you, nor even if you're providing them with what they want.  

    And on a slightly different note but similar theme, how about badges or the various other ways members show their team colors to the world - are these good for developing group identity? 


    Best, Karenne


    This posting is part of the Crowd Wise series and is in part my preparation for the swap-shop I will be hosting on web-based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

    To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:
    http://kalinago.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default/-/crowd-wise  into your reader.  

    Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

    Videos for Valentine's Day

    I'm sure you've all got your Valentine's Day lessons sorted but just in case you're looking for a nice video to use in class on Friday/Monday as conversation starters...

    Here are a few of my favorites plus an old one I made for a friend:



    6 Billion Others
    This beautiful video actually inspired one of my students to download and mash-up into a new version for his brother's wedding, adding interviews from the rest of his family on what love means.














    The Break-up
    Satirical look at marketing practices in 2010 - a good one to show to Business students who you perhaps don't want to do something mushier with.

















    Valentine's Day, the trailer
    Cheese. Pure cheese. Use with teenagers.

















    Ah, L'Amour
    A short, sweet and engaging film on modern love.

















    Plenty of Fish
    Um, yea. I made this last year for a friend who got divorced after 15 years of marriage and was my way of cheering her up.  It's actually a poem so if you read it aloud, you'll have more fun with it than just watching! :-)















    More videos

    Each video chosen should be significantly poignant that it will generate conversations, dogme 2.0 style, in your lessons so I've not added any questions of my own, however, here are some useful links:



    Best,
    Karenne

    p.s. Did you find or create a material / read or write a blog post for teachers with ideas for Valentine's day?  Don't hesitate to add the link below.

    p.p.s. Not to be all bah-humbugie (that was Christmas, right) but ya kno' I, personally, despite having gotten married on Valentine's Day myself, think it's all a bit materialistic and plastic.  What do you think?    In Ecuador, they made the day a celebration of friendship too and I quite liked that!  So... dear readers, Happy Valentine's!

    The Carnival of English Language Lessons



    Following on from Shelly Terrell's edition of the 15th ESL/EFL Carnival, I'll be responsible for hosting the next and I've decided to do something a little bit different:

    It shall have a focus, a theme, which is:


    LESSONS




    In other words...
    • Warmers and Icebreakers
    • Projects and Real-life Tasks
    • Free practice and Controlled Gapfillers
    • Role-plays and Case-studies
    • Games for kids
    • Team building exercises for teens
    • Discussions for adult learners
    • And lots, lots more!


      So send in your creativity, knowledge, experience...  in short, the links to your very best lessons!



      Use this form:



      Deadline:  March 21st, 2010
      Publish date: April 1st, 2010




      Questions?

      Don't hesitate to ask!

      Karenne

      p.s. Mary Ann Zehr at Learning the Language will host the Carnival on June 1st. You can see all the previous editions of the ESL/EFL/ELL Blog Carnival here.     What is a blog carnival?





      WHAT TO DO IF YOU USED THE STANDARD BLOG-CARNIVAL FORM ALREADY?
      • I will be in touch with you shortly. For this Carnival, you will need to use the google-form, as linked above.

      WHAT TO DO IF YOU DON'T HAVE A BLOG BUT YOU WOULD LIKE TO PARTICIPATE:
      • Fill in the form by March 1st, 2010.
      • I will try to match you with a blogger who blogs in your lesson's genre.

      WHAT TO DO IF YOU ARE A BLOGGER WHO WOULD BE INTERESTED IN HOSTING GUEST-PIECES BY TEACHERS WHO DON'T HAVE BLOGS
      • Write me a note below in the comment box. 
      • Post a call-out on your own blogs for guest lessons written by your readers.

      Getting Students Learning English through YouTube, H2LE (2)

      This is the 2nd part of a the H-2-L-E series which contains a sheet you'll be able to share with your adult English language students so they can become more autonomous learners.

      Did you know that there are some absolutely fabulous channels on YouTube which students can use to practice English?

      In this sheet I will focus on some of the ones geared specifically at Adult English Language Learners.

      Here is a quick preview of the ones that I often share with my own students:


      Jennifer ESL:  http://www.youtube.com/user/JenniferESL
      Viewed over 1 million times, Jennifer's 144 videos range from teaching grammar to common expressions, phrasal verbs, American slang.  She offers help with pronunciation and even basic grammar and understanding prepositions.













      Mister Duncan  http://www.youtube.com/user/duncaninchina
      This slightly nutty professor has made over 50 videos viewed 750,000 times and topics range from small talk topics, talking about cars or technology and general life issues like discussing health.  Some are serious reports, some are just plain odd!














      Soxo Exchange http://www.youtube.com/user/sozoexchange
      An extraordinary channel consisting of people simply pronouncing common words and phrases slowly and carefully, showing learners how to do it themselves.














      Learn English with Steve Ford  http://www.youtube.com/user/PrivateEnglishPortal
      Quirky Teaching English series of linked stories- soap opera style... however interjected with serious lessons and good clear explanations.













      Business English Videos for ESL   http://www.youtube.com/user/bizpod
      Wide ranging videos perfect for Business English learners.  They cover diverse topics including grammar, business letter writing, email tune-ups and more.   The channel also includes specialized topics e.g IT and Computing, Legal and Financial vocabulary.












      Do you know of any other good Youtube channels aimed at teaching English?  Share the information with us if they are sites which you and your students really enjoy learning from.


      Miscellaneous extras:
      In the spirit of not being judgmental... this, *blush* site is not at all for everyone but as some guys might have fun passing on the link to males they teach, I'll turn in the other direction while I give it to you -  no... I'll say oh heck, it's tacky but good and she is teaching vocabulary... it's just her way of sharing knowledge!
      Um... 278 million views.
      http://www.youtube.com/user/hotforwords  ((Not listed on the master sheet though)).

      Finally, if you teach kids or your students have them, this is a lovely site of very simple songs.
      http://www.youtube.com/user/SuperSimpleSongs

      Best,
      Karenne



      p.s. if you found this post useful, you might also like
        image credit: www.norcalblogs.com/watts/images/youtube_tv.jpg

          Crowd Wise 2: Online Community Platforms


           I think it's fair to say that personal computers have become the most empowering tool 
          we've ever created. They're tools of communication, they're tools of creativity, 
          and they can be shaped by their user.Bill Gates


           Do you run, co-moderate or belong to a community of like-minded educators or learners online? 

          Which platform(s) do you use?

          Yahoo!Group, Moodle, Ning, Drupal, Elgg, Wiki, Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, Jamendo, Slideshare, LinkedIn, Xing, Flickr, Diigo..?


          Which do you think is the best one?


          How'd you rate it for things like the

          - ease of use
          - cost
          - ability to find and communicate with other participants
          - ability to share documents
          - ability to share photos, media
          - ability to gather opinions
          - ability to collaborate on projects
          - keep track of and follow threaded conversations

          And
          - things which really irritate you
          - things you really miss from a different platform
          - anything else?

          Best,
          Karenne

          This posting is part of the Crowd Wise series and is in part my preparation for the swap-shop I will be hosting on web-based communities at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, April 8th 2010.  Your answers, as brief or as in-depth as you'd like to be, is very much appreciated!

          To subscribe to all the posts within this specific series, copy and paste this url:
          http://kalinago.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default/-/crowd-wise  into your reader.  

          Note: if you would like to participate in this conversation anonymously, please do feel free to do so.  Alternatively, if you would like to specifically mention an online educational community when making reference to your experiences, adding your group's name and/or its URL, you are most welcome to!

          Crowd Wise 1: Introduction to this series

          Computers are magnificent tools for the realization of our dreams, 
          but no machine can replace the human spark of spirit, 
          compassion, love, and understanding.
          Louis Gerstner


          On Thursday, April 8th 2010,  I'll be hosting a discussion, a share-meet if you will, as my first presentation at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate

          The title:
          Crowd Wise


          The participants

          Anyone running an online community with students, teachers or other educators.

          The blurb

          A brief presentation of psychological, historical and evolutionary aspects of real-life tribal communities followed by a swap-shop reviewing the key roles of e-participants; discussing group life cycles, net-i-quette issues and conflict resolution; a comparison of web platforms and sharing tips for accessing the wisdom of the crowd.



          Anyway, basically, I thought I'd do a swap-shop and open discussion, rather than a workshop or lecture.

          Many of us who run e-communities have paths that cross frequently (on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or even in each others communities) however, we very rarely get an opportunity to sit down  face-to-face and say

          "Hey, xyz works really well in my community but you know, I tried abc - which I saw mnopq do well, but oddly enough it didn't for us... what about in your group, did you try?   Oh you did fgh instead?  Great concept..."


          So, in a series of posts running from now until end March, I thought I'd begin to explore some of the subjects we'll be chatting about, on this blog, and that way I can get  to know more of  your thoughts and access your wisdom; see what's most pressing, what's not such a big deal (limited time there and all that) and then feed these into the session... plus your comments would also help to create the discussion cards!


          Topics include:

          The 10min Presentation
          • Animal/human evolution and the move towards the creation of tribes
          • The psychology and historical implications behind forming tribes and creating tribal roles
          • The relationship between community positions in Real Life versus roles in our Online Lives.

          The 45min Swap-Shop
          • Online platforms
          • Group identity
          • Individual identity 
          • Roles
          • Collaboration, invention and working together
          • Life cycles of Groups
          • Differences in working with learners vs educators
          • Tribes and cash

          In my next postings, I'll be highlighting each of the above as individual postings and I'll link back as I go through each for a more concentrated discussion.

          Have I missed any core topics?  Got a question?   Don't hesitate to add your thoughts!


          The process

          1. Blog posts from today until end March
          2. Discussion at IATEFL
          3. Summary based on swap-shop
          4. Free pdf available: blog posts (selected comments included + notes from conference


          Best,
          Karenne


          updated 13.02.10
          The video mentioned by Elizabeth Anne below in the comments is
          PBS Frontline, Digital Nation: Life on the virtual frontier

          ELT Blogosphere and Twitterverse, Summary January 2010

          Stuff I wrote and stuff I really enjoyed reading this month....

          Teaching English and other ELT Related Issues
          from Kalinago English

          from the Blogosphere

          from the Twitterverse




          Lessons, Tips & Ideas for the classroom
          from Kalinago English

          from the Blogosphere




          from the Twitterverse




          Technology Related Issues and Tips
          from Kalinago English
           
          from the Blogosphere


          from the Twitterverse








          Social Media
          from Kalinago English

          from the Blogosphere



          from the Twitterverse


          New!!! ELT-Bloggers to check out



          Useful links related to this posting:
          Lives of Teachers, Weekly Twitter Updates
          Teacher Reboot Camp, What did they Tweet

          Best,
          Karenne
           

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